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Posts Tagged ‘windows 8’

MSSLIDE

Microsoft has confirmed that it will be refreshing its Surface Windows 8 tablet range over the coming 12 months.

The company has been outlining its plans for 2013 and beyond at its Worldwide Partner Conference this week, and the company’s tablet plans have been briefly touched upon.

Microsoft’s chief operating office Kevin Turner revealed a slide that acted as a loose update roadmap for the coming year. Among the various Skypes and Bings, there were four entries for Surface.

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Microsoft’s announcement Wednesday that it will add Outlook to Office on Windows RT says as much about the company’s app problem as it does about customers clamoring for the business-grade email client, an analyst argued.

Yesterday, Microsoft said that Outlook RT 2013 will be added this fall to the existing quartet that now makes up Office Home & Student 2013 RT, the suite that’s bundled with Windows RT. The app will be part of Windows 8.1, formerly code named “Blue,” which will be a free update to Windows RT and Windows 8.

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SAN FRANCISCO: Microsoft will add its popular Outlook email program to more tablets running on a lightweight version of its Windows operating system as part of a free software update this year.

The Outlook 2013 app will be given to owners of Microsoft’s Surface tablet and similar devices running Windows RT. That’s a slimmed down version of Windows 8, a radical overhaul of the ubiquitous operating system used on most personal computers.

Microsoft Corp. is preparing to modify Windows 8 in response to consumer complaints about the redesigned system released last October. The Redmond, Wash., company announced the addition of Outlook for Windows RT tablets Wednesday at a computer trade show in Taiwan.

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San Francisco: Microsoft is retooling the latest version of its Windows operating system to address complaints and confusion that have been blamed for deepening a slump in personal computer sales.

The tune up announced Tuesday won’t be released to consumers and businesses until later this year. The changes, part of a software package given the codename “Blue,” are a tacit acknowledgment of the shortcomings in Windows 8, a radical overhaul of Microsoft Corp.’s ubiquitous operating system.

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After a sluggish 2013 start, Microsoft’s Window 8 App Store appears to be attracting new titles again.

The online outlet vaulted the 50,000 app mark Saturday, according to MetroStore Scanner, a website that unofficially monitors app activity at the Microsoft outlet.

That’s a global number, so all those apps may not be available to U.S. users.

Since the high-profile launch of the Windows 8 Twitter app on March 13, only 49 new apps have hit the US version of the Windows Store. However, Metrostore Scanner—the tracking service this report is based on—shows that 3000-plus new  apps have appeared globally during the same time frame.

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THERE are regular notebooks, the slim and svelte ultrabooks, and of course, Chromebooks which are extremely Google-centric for obvious reasons.

Those who have tried out a Chromebook will most probably give positive feedback for its ease-of-use, speed and security while offering a fair number of options where shape, size and price are concerned.

HP has been roped into the Chromebook range for the new year, with the introduction of the HP Pavilion 14 Chromebook. It comes with the integrated security, speed and simplicity that one expects to be associated with a Chromebook.
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The Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga is part of a new breed of convertible Windows 8 notebooks that can double up as large tablets

The launch of Windows 8 was considered by many as a new era of personal computing, especially for laptop devices. The new operating system (OS) has been completely redesigned for touch input (though it did retain some familiar elements such as the desktop environment), and with it came new and interesting ways of interacting with your PC. After all, with general consensus now being we’re in a post-PC era and embracing the era of cloud computing, there’s a greater need for devices and interfaces that are adept at handling touch inputs in an intuitive manner.

Having said that, most of the flagship Windows 8 machines now include multi-touch displays to take advantage of the touch-friendly user interface. And if that wasn’t enough, manufacturers have also introduced a new variant of Ultrabooks, known as the convertible Ultrabooks. These notebooks are still very much Ultrabooks in nature, but they are able to ‘transform’ and function as tablets when the need arises. One of the hallmarks of a good convertible Ultrabook is to transform themselves from notebook to tablet mode seamlessly.

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Microsoft’s Surface tablet running a full version of Windows 8 Pro will start selling in January for US$899 and up, the company has said.

But you’ll have to pay more if you want a keyboard cover and the popular Office suite of software.

The current Surface uses the slimmed down Windows RT operating system. As a result, it runs only specially designed applications from Microsoft and others sold through the company’s online store. The Pro version of Surface will also run regular Windows applications written for desktops and laptops.

“It’s a full PC AND a tablet,” Surface general manager Panos Panay wrote in a blog post Thursday.

The Surface represents Microsoft’s first foray into manufacturing its own general-purpose computer. In doing so, the company is competing with some of its partners, the manufacturers of PCs and tablets.

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SAN FRANCISCO — It wasn’t hard to tell whom Microsoft was trying to win over with its Windows Phone 8 launch event Monday.

Microsoft transformed an area of a civic-center auditorium into a temporary swanky, chill lounge, complete with mood lighting and lit wall panels echoing Windows Phone’s live tile colors.

Also, Jessica Alba showed up.

It all added up to some words not commonly associated with Microsoft: fun and cool.

Clearly, Microsoft — long associated with work, productivity and your company’s IT department (the success of Xbox notwithstanding) — was trying to reach younger, hip consumers and attempting to do so not by talking about detailed specs, but by conveying a cohesive story about the overall meaning of the phone to people’s lives.

Microsoft wanted to build a phone that could be personalized to each individual, said Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, adding, “Windows Phone 8 is the culmination of these efforts. … [It] is the most personal smartphone out there.”

Executives also stressed how Windows Phone 8, along with other Microsoft devices and services, can make users’ lives easier by tying in smoothly with the company’s cloud services, products and entertainment offerings such as SkyDrive, Office and Xbox Music and Video.

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With Windows 8, launched on Friday, Microsoft wants to ensure that its new operating system runs on all form factors – desktops, notebooks and even tablets. The software giant foresees people using a common OS, seamlessly interoperating between different devices without any glitches. It also envisions hybrid gizmos that can function as a fullfledged tablet or laptop depending on the user’s requirements. Of course, to create an OS that would work just as well with touchscreens as it would with the keyboard and mouse, MS has had to make some big changes to Windows.

Logging in

Windows 8 is heavily integrated with Microsoft’s web services. Users are provided with the ability to log on to their PCs with a Windows Live ID (instead of a more traditional local user account) for seamless functioning between various devices. For example, if you’re following certain news feeds in the Reader app on your tablet, the same content will also be available to you on your PC. Besides you are automatically logged-on to those Metro-style apps and services that use your Live ID for authentication.

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